Data and Privacy: 2018-2019 Outlook: Data Centers and Security

Does your data center take security to the next level? In our latest e-Book, we address how you can best protect yourself from data breaches, the latest on privacy laws and more. To wrap up this particular e-Book blog series, we’re talking about common security measures you can find in secure data centers.

Hacking, malware and spyware are the most obvious threats to data privacy, and there is also the physical aspect of IT security to keep in mind. Data centers and carrier hotels, such as 165 Halsey Street, take security to a whole new level. Below are just a few examples of security measures that should be taken in a secure data center:

  • Top of the Line Surveillance Systems
  • Security Guards
  • Strategic Building Design
  • Access Control

There are many additional countermeasures employed by data centers. Check with your data center specifically on all security measures utilized.

Why choose 165 Halsey Street?

165 Halsey Street is a dedicated 1.2M sf data center/colocation/telecom carrier hotel with over 80 MW of power. The building has been operating a carrier neutral colocation business for more than 15 years,  and presently spans over 180,000 square feet with no MRC cross connect fees and direct access to over 60 networks.

Located just 13 miles from Manhattan, 165 Halsey Street is independently owned and operated and SSAE 16-certified. With 165 Halsey Colocation, there are no monthly recurring cross connect fees between customers, allowing safe, convenient and affordable interconnection.

Data & Privacy: 2018-2019 Outlook – What’s Ahead for More Privacy Laws?

In our ongoing e-Book blog series, we’ve addressed GDPR, stats on the latest global data privacy and more. Today, we’re taking a peek into the future to learn what lies ahead for additional privacy laws.

As of March 2018, in response to the EU’s newly enacted GDPR, all U.S. states, as well as the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, have enacted breach notification laws requiring businesses to notify consumers if their personal information is compromised. These new and amended state data breach laws further define personal information and specifically mandate that certain information security requirements are implemented.

The expanding global privacy and security community will need to address the complicated data security issues in the coming year. The issues include GDPR implementation and related data transfer rules for the EU and globally, as well as practical and operational issues that involve putting best practices for new data and technology into place. Data professionals are strongly needed to become “effective stewards of company data, with appropriate consideration of individual privacy and appropriate business goals,” and companies must focus on the need to manage individual data, while dealing with the onslaught of legislative and regulatory overlaps and the need for effective integration of privacy and security controls.

If you’re ready to talk data security with a professional, reach out to 165 Halsey Street today.

The Heart, The Data Center

Technology is pretty much at the heart of everything we do, and the world continues to become more and more digital. As we previously mentioned in our e-Book, an IDC study predicts that by 2020, we’ll have 44 zettabytes of data worldwide, as compared to just three exabytes in 1986. That’s not just a little bit of data, that’s a lot! So, if you think of your own heart, you probably don’t pay much attention to it beating in your chest on a daily basis. It does what it is supposed to do; pumping and receiving blood, day and night. Technology is similar to the heart. You might not notice or know how the technology you use is working, but it is and you generally expect it to keep doing its job, day and night.

How technology does its job is important. Enter the data center; the blood flow and lifeline to the technologies we use everyday. While the adoption of the cloud continues to grow, the need for on-premise systems doesn’t come to a screeching halt. Data centers have a strong heartbeat. It was reported by IHS Markit, who surveyed IT managers at 151 North American organizations, that most respondents expect to double the amount of physical servers in their data centers by 2019. Furthermore, Cushman & Wakefield estimates multi-tenant revenue growth will be 12% to 14% each year for the next two to five years. Another interesting find from the State of the Data Center AFCOM study was that a set of statistics showed that new data center construction will grow more than five times over the next three years.

As 2018 starts to come to a close and 2019 begins, the data center will remain a critical piece to many technology operations.

Talk to us at 165 Halsey Street to see how our data center can best support your business technology operations.

 

2018 Data Center Trends: Serverless Cloud

It’s time to talk about the serverless cloud; a highlight of one of the trends in our recently released e-book, “The Data Center in 2018: New Technologies and Trends.”

To create the ‘serverless cloud,’ servers are still needed, but the cloud computing execution model is what makes it stand out from traditional models. Serverless computing stands out because it can adapt dynamically and manage the allocation of machine resources based only on what is being used. Not to mention, that it provides a prime opportunity for efficiency and flexibility, yielding a 5-10x efficiency gain, according to CIO.

Furthermore, serverless cloud adoption is set to rise for several reasons including the growth of smart applications and the impact it has on business costs.

To find out exactly how it will impact data center professionals specifically, download our e-book here!