Data Center In 2019: An Aging Workforce?

Last year, Uptime Institute released a survey about the data center industry, and some of the findings pointed to the fact that young people are not very interested in pursuing careers in the data center. The survey consisted of managers and engineers of which 56% had over 20 years of experience, illustrating a distinct lack of entry level or early career employees.

Due to the lack of pre-professional and college programs, data center managers have found it hard to source employees that have the correct skills to work in data center operations. In fact, 65% of the data center managers surveyed said that they were facing these issues. However, all of that could be changing.

According to the most recent AFCOM State of the Data Center Report, 70% of respondents are starting to see younger faces around their data centers, but 34% are still finding it difficult to hireyoung people. So, how can we make the data center industry more attractive to younger generations? Here are some options: Data Center

  • Make your workplace more appealing to young people by considering the fact that younger generations, specifically millennials, all grew up being connected all the time. They know how to remain productive while using their technology, and oftentimes desire to work remotely.
  • Expose young people to the industry before college. Funds need to be allocated to programs that will expose high school and junior high school students to the industry, ultimately making it more visible. Instead of sticking with education focused on basic computer science or networking, there need to be programs that connect these concepts to the data center.
  • Increase diversity. Plain and simple, the data center industry is male-dominated and that needs to change. The industry need to integrate with STEM programs to support and recruit more women into the field, as well as the fact that skills developed in STEM programs will also help with future infrastructure implementations.

We are at a better place than we were last year, but this shift will take time. The changes in sentiment will not happen overnight, and high school programs won’t be funded at the drop of a hat. We need to come together as an industry to combat this issue, before all of our employees retire.

Data and Privacy: 2018-2019 Outlook: Data Centers and Security

Does your data center take security to the next level? In our latest e-Book, we address how you can best protect yourself from data breaches, the latest on privacy laws and more. To wrap up this particular e-Book blog series, we’re talking about common security measures you can find in secure data centers.

Hacking, malware and spyware are the most obvious threats to data privacy, and there is also the physical aspect of IT security to keep in mind. Data centers and carrier hotels, such as 165 Halsey Street, take security to a whole new level. Below are just a few examples of security measures that should be taken in a secure data center:

  • Top of the Line Surveillance Systems
  • Security Guards
  • Strategic Building Design
  • Access Control

There are many additional countermeasures employed by data centers. Check with your data center specifically on all security measures utilized.

Why choose 165 Halsey Street?

165 Halsey Street is a dedicated 1.2M sf data center/colocation/telecom carrier hotel with over 80 MW of power. The building has been operating a carrier neutral colocation business for more than 15 years,  and presently spans over 180,000 square feet with no MRC cross connect fees and direct access to over 60 networks.

Located just 13 miles from Manhattan, 165 Halsey Street is independently owned and operated and SSAE 16-certified. With 165 Halsey Colocation, there are no monthly recurring cross connect fees between customers, allowing safe, convenient and affordable interconnection.

The Heart, The Data Center

Technology is pretty much at the heart of everything we do, and the world continues to become more and more digital. As we previously mentioned in our e-Book, an IDC study predicts that by 2020, we’ll have 44 zettabytes of data worldwide, as compared to just three exabytes in 1986. That’s not just a little bit of data, that’s a lot! So, if you think of your own heart, you probably don’t pay much attention to it beating in your chest on a daily basis. It does what it is supposed to do; pumping and receiving blood, day and night. Technology is similar to the heart. You might not notice or know how the technology you use is working, but it is and you generally expect it to keep doing its job, day and night.

How technology does its job is important. Enter the data center; the blood flow and lifeline to the technologies we use everyday. While the adoption of the cloud continues to grow, the need for on-premise systems doesn’t come to a screeching halt. Data centers have a strong heartbeat. It was reported by IHS Markit, who surveyed IT managers at 151 North American organizations, that most respondents expect to double the amount of physical servers in their data centers by 2019. Furthermore, Cushman & Wakefield estimates multi-tenant revenue growth will be 12% to 14% each year for the next two to five years. Another interesting find from the State of the Data Center AFCOM study was that a set of statistics showed that new data center construction will grow more than five times over the next three years.

As 2018 starts to come to a close and 2019 begins, the data center will remain a critical piece to many technology operations.

Talk to us at 165 Halsey Street to see how our data center can best support your business technology operations.

 

Data Center Trends in 2018: Data Center Modernization

As each day passes, there’s no stopping the need for enterprises to continue to modernize. By 2020, more than 55% of these enterprises will be forced to do so. Why? It starts with the workload demands of next-generation applications and IT architectures.

In 2018, technical professionals focused on IT infrastructure will adopt disruptive technologies to enable hybrid cloud architectures that meet the demands of digital business and IoT. Furthermore, IT professionals concur, in a recent report by Avanade, that ignoring trends in IT modernization could lead to negative consequences when it comes to growth. IDC also forecasts that about 30% percent of companies will include data center planning and processes as part of their plans to speed digital transformational efforts.

Learn the three areas that should be considered when analyzing various opportunities for data center modernization or consolidation and more in our latest e-book!